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Home > Blog > Performance > The Barrett-Jackson Auction Spectacle Blog
Kevin Butler

Kevin Butler

Auto Parts Network

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January 22nd, 2013


The Barrett-Jackson Auction Spectacle

Car auctions aren’t anything new. But when it comes to a Barrett-Jackson auction, one of the world’s largest collectors of distinctive cars, bidding for unique and valuable vehicles is more than an event, it’s a spectacle. Barrett-Jackson’s most recent auction in Scottsdale, AZ gathered auto enthusiasts around the world who had the chance to flex their bidding muscles. While each vehicle sold was notable, there were some select cars that really revved up the bid price.

At an event like this, it’s possible that the motivation for buying a vehicle is collecting it, rather than use it for utility purposes. One of the most talked about vehicles, the original 1966 Batmobile sold for $4.2 million. While the Batmobile may not be a practical everyday car to get you to the grocery store, it’s no surprise that the cult favorite became the priciest car in Barrett-Jackson history.

But speaking of more classic vehicles that are a bit more sensible a 1958 Chevrolet Corvetter previously owned by GM CEO Dan Akerson and late actor Clark Gable’s 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL also hit some sweet numbers.

Old-school classics aside, one vehicle that was practically driven off the assembly line, Chevrolet’s Corvette C7 Stingray also made a splash at the auction as the first production vehicle sold for $1.1 million.

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